Climate Action Q&A #5

and this Little Piggy went Wee Wee Wee, all the way home.

Q: Little Piggy’s home is in Wellington. Do you think it is better for Little Piggy to go there by car, plane or train?

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Which means of transport has the least impact on climate change.

A: Driving a petrol car, Little Piggy would put 127 Kg Carbon Dioxide* in to the atmosphere. That is a lot more than flying (71 kg**). Taking the bus would be better, (44 Kg***) and the train better again (25 Kg****).

But driving a battery electric vehicle is the best for cherishing our earth – only 15 Kg of carbon dioxide*****.

Something to remember when you think about buying a new electric vehicle – there is a lot of carbon embedded in the car before you drive it out of the showroom. How many kilometres of do you need to drive before the embedded carbon is recovered in savings per kilometre? This is called the carbon payback distance.

For a Nissan Leaf, that is 8,000 Km – less than a year’s driving for most of us. A Tesla however, has a carbon payback period of around 35,000 Km – perhaps 3 – 4 years of driving.


Based on MfE emissions factor (EF) data and:
* Road distance Auckland – Wellington is 639 km, EF (petrol) = 0.1984 KG CO2/Km
** Air distance Auckland – Wellington is 480 km, EF (petrol) = 0.1474 KG CO2/Km
*** Bus distance Auckland – Wellington is 666 km, EF (petrol) = 0.066 KG CO2/Km
**** Train distance Auckland – Wellington is 682 km, EF (petrol) = 0.036 KG CO2/Km
***** Road distance Auckland – Wellington is 639 km, EF (battery EV) = 0.024 KG CO2/Km


This series of posts is based around a resource prepared by Anglicans CAN for an Expo organised by Community Networks Franklin

keep reading for more about this Anglicans CAN climate action

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Climate Action Q&A #4

This Little Piggy had none…

Q: What impact do the foods we eat have on our climate?

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A: Plenty.  And we need to do something about that.

The global average carbon footprint for beef is 26.6 Kg CO2/Kg beef. New Zealand’s pasture-based beef has a footprint less than half of this. Compare this to crayfish with a carbon footprint of 27.8 Kg CO2/Kg fish or sole at 20.8 Kg CO2/Kg fish.

By the time your beef gets to the kitchen bench, it’s carbon footprint is typically three times that of the production on farms.  Making farmers accountable for all of beef’s off-farm emissions is not what a just transition needs to be about.

The solution is a localised food production system focused on organic, seasonal and fresh foods that include some meat but mainly vegetable.

Also, did you know that taking dairy out of our diet and replacing the minerals and nutrients with alternatives, results in the same or only slightly lowered carbon footprint?


Growing Your Own Food is something that each of us can do as a climate action.  St Andrews Anglican Church have a community learning and demonstration garden and offer a Grow Your Own Food course for beginners. 

The communal food garden at St Andrews Pukekohe. Note the rain water collection system (left) and the composting system (on the far side of the raised pallet-bed.


This series of posts is based around a resource prepared by Anglicans CAN for an Expo organised by Community Networks Franklin

keep reading for more about this Anglicans CAN climate action

Climate Action Q&A #3

This Little Piggy had roast beef…

Q: Is eating beef bad for the planet?

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A: The short answer is no, eating beef is not bad for the planet.

Reducing our beef consumption would be good for our health, but New Zealand beef is better for the planet than beef grown in other parts of the world.

The problem that needs fixing is with how some farmers grow their beef.

Also, we need to consider that around two thirds of the carbon in that steak on our plate, is from off-farm activities – the butchering, packaging and distribution.



This series of posts is based around a resource prepared by Anglicans CAN for an Expo organised by Community Networks Franklin

keep reading for more about this Anglicans CAN climate action

Climate Action Q&A #2

This Little Piggy stayed home…

Q: How can we take carbon out of the atmosphere?

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A:  If Little Piggy stayed home to plant trees and make biochar, then a lot of carbon dioxide would be taken out of the atmosphere each year.

That would be around 3,200,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide*** removed from the atmosphere by 2030 if each of us planted one hardwood tree today.

BTW: if Little Piggy planted native trees instead of exotic hardwoods,
then much less carbon would be removed (around four fifths or
80% less*** than exotic hardwoods).

And if each person burned ten kilogram of dry wood to make biochar, we would remove around 50,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide+++ from the atmosphere.


*** from data downloaded from NZ Ministry of Primary Industries Jan 2019 (500 stems/Ha assumed)
2017-ETS-look-up-tables-guide-3.pdf http://www.mpi.govt.nz/growing-and-producing/forestry/forestry-in-the-emissions-trading-scheme/emissions-returns/

+++ own calculation: 27% (by weight) biochar yield from dry timber (at 20% moisture content) and 1 kg C == 3.667 Kg CO2.


This series of posts is based around a resource prepared by Anglicans CAN for an Expo organised by Community Networks Franklin

keep reading for more about this Anglicans CAN climate action

Climate Action Q&A #1

This Little Piggy went to market…

Q: How fast should Little Piggy go when driving to the market?

——

Plot of CO2 emissions at actual speeds compared to those at 100 kph

A: No faster than 80 Km per hour.

For each one kilometre we travel at 10 kph below our open road speed limit (of 100 kph), we avoid dumping around 0.03 KG of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere.   

That does not sound very much, but with 3.8 million light vehicles*** in the New Zealand fleet travelling at total of 22,208 million km at open road speeds***, that represents a total of 651 KT CO2/year, or around 4.4% of the transport sector emissions.  Step the speed reduction up to 20kph, the emissions reductions would total 1,220 KT CO2/year which equates to around 8.2% of the transport emissions.


***data downloaded from NZ Ministry of Transport Jan 2019
The New Zealand 2017 Vehicle Fleet : Data Spreadsheet
Version 4.0, September 2018


This series of posts is based around a resource prepared by Anglicans CAN for an Expo organised by Community Networks Franklin

keep reading for more about this Anglicans CAN climate action